Saturday, July 26, 2008

RAMSEY HARBOUR,THE JANE OIL TANKER

Whilst undertaking further research about Ramsey Harbour and it's past I happened upon many a quirky tale. One, I am really hoping to post sometime, but I want to separate the myth, legend and fact. History remember isn't always what actually happened but who committed it to paper.

Ramsey Harbour still is a working harbour, though not the grand shipbuilding harbour of yesteryear. I've mentioned previously of The Star Of India known as the Euterpe as the most famous ship built here but not of The Jane.

Mid 19th century Ramsey it seems led the way in shipbuilding. The first ship designed to carry bulk oil, commonly known as an oil tanker was built at this very harbour and name "The Jane." Apparently The Jane transported oil around various places of which the only one I have found named is Philadelphia in 1853. Again I find out a cute little story and find the trail ends abruptly.
No photos or even many write ups about this once famous oil tanker. I put a sepia tint on one of harbour images to again set the tone of the post.

So why the interest to me? The other Jane of Ramsey is the author of this blog. So it must be destiny to continue the blog after all.

Has the trail ever run cold on your town research?

29 comments:

Rob said...

I do like this sepia tone. Something I have not used, yet. Also, I always have an interest in history, but somteimtes the legend is more important then actual historic events.

Nora said...

I was here for sky watch but the oil tanker in the haror got my interest much more as I love boats etc. ....and I love how you aged the photo...always a pleasure to see you...cheers.

Lake Lady said...

So, both Janes are elusive, mysterious and un-photographed?? Wonder which one we'll see first??
Love the shot. Enlarged it and realized tide must have been out, eh? Weird to see the boats sitting there waiting to float again!

Julie said...

The sepia-isation (ugh!) complements your text. Is that hills amongst them there clouds? I do a lot of historical research on Sydney as I drive my aged father around each Saturday morning and he likes the yarns I spin. I was researching the beginnings of The University of Sydney and wanted to know more about land-use prior to 1850. Both the Mitchell & Fisher libraries were extremely helpful until I wanted more info about 1792 and Governor Grose. Fascinating pathways to travel though ...

I went out to an old shipbuilding yard in the middle of Sydney Harbour a couple of weeks ago. Great opportunities for photography.

Enjoyable post, Jane ... err ... Babooshka!

Harry Makertia said...

I love monochrome photography, but I have to learn a lot to work on it. I never succeed to have a good one. Sometimes, I'll post mine, and see how people like it.

Eki said...

Thanks for sharing the history, Babooshka. I didn't know about Jane. Now I know. The tone you chose for your picture (sepia) is, I think, "historical" :)

Have a great weekend.

Eki said...

(And this is a comment for your previous post): The other day I shared your blog with one of my students, a British millitary officer learning Indonesian language. It so happened he has visited the Ramsey quite a few times, and told me a lot about Manxman, the symbol of the Isle of Man and the endemic/local cat with no tail ... He loves Isle of Man. He said it's one of the most beautiful places in UK. What a small world! :)

Baruch said...

Interesting information - Love the sepia tone

Kyanite said...

Thanks for the link to the Vintage Postcard blog, it's looks fun - will have to spend some time, going through her back posts.

mrsnesbitt said...

Wow! A tanker named after you? Awesome!
Dxx

Janet Kincaid said...

Interesting history. And a wonderful photo to go with it. When I enlarged it, my eye was drawn to the guy on the roof of the building in the background. Go figure!

JAMJARSUPERSTAR said...

I always love the photos that have the sepia/b+w effect. They have a kind of nostalgic feel in my opinion.
Ciao

Scarlet x

Irredento Urbanita said...

In that port I can feel some broken story.

Regards


Barcelona Daily Photo

Irredento Urbanita said...

In that port I can feel some broken story.

Regards


Barcelona Daily Photo

Markus Latva-aho said...

Hi! It's great looking harbour, waiting to see more good quality pictures as this.

Kane Hsieh said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Kane Hsieh said...

Hey, could I put your site under a "recommended photoblogs" listing at my own new photoblog? crimsongb.blogspot.com. I'm trying to get into the community. Thanks!

Maria Verivaki said...

great little bit of history
the sepia tone doesn't do it for me - i prefer to see something the way it is now (apart from that, i'm not exactly well versed on using photoshop!)

Whitney said...

cool pic!! Interesting post!

Anonymous said...

I disagree with kiwi. The sepia works better than black and white would.Old box brownie.

marley said...

Yes, many times I've wanted to tell you alls omething of interest about a photo and the info is just not out there!

Anonymous said...

Ditto! Nice work on the photo.

Ming the Merciless said...

Your post made me wonder: where are all the new ships built nowadays? If the old ports are closing, I haven't heard of new ports opening.

Pat said...

Very interesting post today, and I like the sepia tones which create a historical atmosphere.

Jane Hards Photography said...

Ming - You've raised avery good point.
I will and given me another idea about checking out the shipbuilding issue further. Good question, by the way.

Eki - Facsinating to hear your meeting of someone who has been to the island. For a small place it has had it's fair share of unexpected tourists.

Louis la Vache said...

hehehe
The Mysteries of The Manx!

Anonymous said...

it was a great idea to post a sepia version of this photo!

Anonymous said...

A wonderful photo. The sepia colour gives it a nostalgic touch.

George Townboy said...

Love it. Love the story, the photo, and the tint, Jane.

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