Wednesday, November 26, 2008

S - SHELLAN MAEY- TO BEE OR NOT TO BEE?

shellan maey- bumble bee

Fancy learning some more Manx? You do? Well you already have. Shellan is the Manx word for bee. Shellan maey is the Manx for bumblebee. Shellan breck is also Manx for bumble bee is used less frequently. The Sheelan Maey above disappearing into the flower head could actually be disappearing now if we don't act soon. Changes in countryside practises, crop rotation, climate change and urbanization( modern housing estates and car parks again!) have lead to a decline in numbers of the poor British bumble. The humble bumble is is a pivotal creature in the pollination of many British crops and rare and garden flowers so don't dismiss the Shellan Maey. Please Take care when you see one, maybe plant some bumble bee friendly blooms. For more the the decline of the British bumblebee and those friendly blooms click here.




Hands up those you thought I was going to have Sulby River or the Ramsey Swing Bridge Swinging for S. Tsk! To bee or not to bee predictable - that is the question. The answer I always choose to be one step ahead- catch me if can you.The original, the best Ramsey Daily Photo.
Ha! Ha!


Want to join ABC got the lovely hostess with the mostest, MRS NESBITT'S PLACE

44 comments:

marley said...

I love the not so obvious! What else will you come up with?! I like all the different names, interesting...as always.

Liz said...

The decline of the honey bee in particular is a real cause for concern.

Lovely photo.

Bevson said...

OK. I did not know there was a Manx language. Is it a dialect of gaelic? It doesn't look like Welsh. Fascinating I love languages.

jacqui said...

Clever clogs, in a nice way.

Kim said...

Thank you for the language lesson, I always enjoy learning something new. Although, my memory stinks so ask me in 10 minutes the Manx word for bee and I probably won't be able to tell you, but I will know where to come to find out :) Great picture, I love fluffy bumble bee butts :)

Rambling Woods said...

True...the bees are in real trouble and then so will we "bee" in trouble

My ABC Wednesday Post

Jana said...

Very pretty. I didn't realize there was a seperate dialect either. That is really interesting to read about.

chick said...

Honey, you got yourself a knockout shot.

George Townboy said...

One step ahead, floating like a butterfly, stinging like a shellan molley. lol

Always entertaining!

magiceye said...

that was interestingly informative. thank you.

Small City Scenes said...

I love the Shellan Meay and all the Shellans around. They in turn love my Lavender and all summer are abuzz in it. They nest in the ground by the Lavender too. Interesting, huh. MB

Gordon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Gordon said...

Your shellen maey is certainly busy; great photo and interesting to read about it and the language too.

photowannabe said...

Very clever and informative. Great post.

Olivier said...

belle photo et surtout macro réussie, j'aime.
beautiful photo and especially macro successful, I love.

A Blog In The Rough said...

wonderful photo and a quite interesting lesson on bees too :)

humanobserver said...

Quite informative....thanks for sharing this.......

Frankie / Nick said...

Very interesting dialogue with a great photo. In total agreement with our views.

antigoni said...

Excellent both posts, ABC and My world!

Aileni said...

Nice reminder of warmer days.

Greyscale Territory said...

I hate to say this, but I don't believe I have ever seen a bumble bee! I am even wondering if Australia has too many (if any)!

Fascinating post and I've had a real close look at your wonderful photo!

RuneE said...

May a shellan breck visit you! ;-)

Bibi said...

The bee and the frog are all endangered; it's so sad. Soon you'll only be able to see these creatures on photographs like yours.

Luiz Ramos said...

Beautiful shot, good info.

Bear Naked said...

Super shot and Shakespeare also.
Wonderful S post.

Bear((( )))

mannanan said...

The thing I love about this site apart from the excellent photography and photography tips is that I learn something new nearly every time I visit. Thank you.

jim said...

Shellan maey I have never heard of and I'm Manx. Thanks for another terric post. We are not all idiots, I appreciate the good work you do.

Sailor Girl said...

Super intereSting poSt, BabooShka, aS alwayS!!!!!!!!

Rose said...

Great post, Babooshka! Thanks for the lesson in Manx; a lovely name for such an important creature. As a gardener, I know how important the bees are, and I do try to plant flowers that will attract them. Last summer I was surrounded by the bumbles in my garden.

Jay said...

Shellan must mean 'flying insect' then, qualified by the second word giving the type?

Do you speak Manx? It's good to know it's being kept alive. :)

Mo said...

I had no idea bumble bees were endangered. How did that wee drone manage to get the biggest name? Lovely flower to gaze at on a grey cold day.

Mo said...

Oh I forgot to answer. Yes I think we will stay in London for Xmas. However may change our minds at the last minute if it gets much colder.

Knoxville Girl said...

ah, but bee-ware thy Sting.
Lovely shot, B.

pam said...

Do you speak Manx? I ask because my friend writes poetry that would suit the language. Very pretty. How do you get so close?

Dragonstar said...

Lovely, informative post, and a very bright idea too!

kjpweb said...

Cool - one never stops learning! :)
Cheers, Klaus

Tanya said...

It's so fun to stop by here and learn your language! :)

istanbuldailyphoto said...

Hello, You Are is wonderful photography hoisted. Bravo. Greetings.

Life with Kaishon said...

Beautiful bee pictures! And, I LOVED learning a language lesson!

dulce said...

... and some peaople say, portuguese is a difficult language ... at least we have only one name for bee (I think ...) :-)

Beautiful and original photo.

D Herrod said...

Very cool.

Suzanne said...

Wow, thanks for all of the completely new information and words. Beautiful photo.

kml said...

Very clever, indeed! You have beautiful images!

Becky said...

Where did the Manx language come from? I'm no expert, but it sounds and looks similar to Welsh. Perhaps they have the same roots?

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin