Saturday, March 07, 2009

HOW TO CREATE ABSTRACT WAVES

Surreal, naturally

No not the sky. Skywatch is the post below. It's an abstract image of a wave crash created naturally with a camera. We've had glass reflections and crashing waves caught in frozen time moments but now for a visual feast of abstract photography. Don't be scared. Come with me on a mini journey to see how it's done.

Now you can take a photo and just play around with your digital software until you get the desired effect. Now me I'm the world's laziest photographer( you get to be good by nailing a shot first time, by being lazy) and I just want to take the image and go. For the image today I wanted to create an arty image of water. The sea was very obliging and tempestuous. Good start. Next I wanted to capture the fluidity of the water, not freeze it. Think looking at a still image but seeing movement. So it's all about shutter speeds and low light. So not a noon shot. What you want are longer shutter speeds. Think the longer the shutter speed the smoother and more silky the waves swirls will be. I wanted to retain a little choppiness so I didn't use a tripod. To get those mist silken water images a tripod, very long shutter speeds, low light and a remote are paramount. To create a slight fuzziness like artist feathery brushstrokes hand held and longish shutter speed will do just fine. One trick I did use was to photograph the water bouncing off the dark promenade wall( not in the image,but left hand side) to intensify the sea-green we get here. So the result you should get is a still image that feels like it's moving, not frozen. Only alteration to the image re sized for the blog. For examples of other shutter speeds and water images see the red words below.

Fast crashing waves
Frozen crashing waves
Mirror image reflection
Still surreal


Taken the same place as the skywatch image in Ramsey. Fortunately I live on an island so water a plenty for me but I appreciate not everyone has access to the Irish Sea on their doorstep. Try photographing a puddle, and overflow pipe, a stream, a gushing leak if you don't have the sea. Necessity if the mother of invention.

Have fun.



33 comments:

mononeil said...

Nature will always win the battle of surreal abstracts that no amount of computers can match. Nice one. I could see this printed on a big canvas in office, hotel or coffee shop.

Stan said...

Thanks for the tips.I'll give it a go.

Tanya said...

Incredible effect!

Virginia said...

Since we have no coastline, I'll have to improvise. Thanks B.
V

Jacob said...

Very effective. Your tips are quite helpful.

Old Wom Tigley said...

Stunning lesson Babooshka, this is something I'd sure like to try out... have a great restful weekend.... or maybe you'd prefer a wild one spent on the razz... :O) what ever your choice enjoy and keep safe my friend..
Tom

magiceye said...

wow! thank you for the explanation..

Indrani said...

Great tutorial! Lots to learn here!
The shot looks magical.

Steve Buser said...

I love the technique insight. Shows there's more to shooting than just picking up a camera.

Ken Mac said...

i want to dive in

Dusty Lens said...

i like the effect of long shutter speed ad moving water. This one is perfect! I have been messing around with longer exposures and zooming in with the lens for interesting movement shots.

Nancy said...

Wish I had the Irish Sea at my doorstep! Thank for the lesson.

Enjoy the weekend.

valeria said...

Bellissimo!

Dave King said...

A masterclass. Interesting to all (I should imagine) and useful to many.

Mediterranean kiwi said...

i've always wanted to photograph splashing waves - they always come out spectacular

Karen said...

Great lesson. I used to do this when I used my 35mm SLR.. now I have a little point & shoot digital. Will try to figure out how to adjust speed to slow it down. Sometimes it happens when I don't want it to so there must be a way.

JM said...

This is truly fantastic, I love it! Well done.

Tina said...

i never knew you could do stuff like that, its really interesting

marley said...

Enjoyed the lesson and photo. I'm going to try it with the tap!

Pierre said...

Bravo it is a art of work you make.

Pierre said...

Bravo it is a art of work you make.

cieldequimper said...

Superb! I'll never be able to do that with my current camera...

cici said...

It is a wall hanger like an oil painting.

Mojo said...

This color is simply astonishing. I'm taking notes on how you got it, believe me. When I get that deep blue-green like this it's usually an accident. No, I take that back... it's an accident.

kRiZ cPEc said...

"necessity is the mother of invention" -100% agree! I bet there are more, eh?

Kitty said...

Thanks for all the useful information :) Will be trying this in the near future...

Chrissy said...

Thanks for your comment on my skywatch photographs. I really do want have a play at misty surreal water so thanks for the advice.
Oh and great Skywatch image, blue skies, it is nearly spring :-)

Bibi said...

Lovely colors; I like experimenting with these shutter speeds and apertures and...and...and...!

gogouci said...

Oooh. Very mood evoking picture.

John said...

Great captured and exposed!

Sight Xperience said...

Thank you for sharing your litlle secrets!
Most of the wellknown pro´s would just skip this!!
This is why I enjoy loosing myself in this blog!

Just M said...

Great effect! I tried a water shot yesterday... not great, but I'll be practicing. Thanks for the info.

susieofarabia said...

Thanks for the great lesson - you always give such wonderful tips and explain them so well. That photo really does look like a painting!

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